You can check if you have had a security breach with an email account, by going to haveibeenpwned.com and inserting your email address. You may have had a security breach even though you have been using strong passwords. You can have accounts that have been compromised by the security failings of organisations that have stored your account details.

On haveibeenpwned.com there is a section where you can enter passwords to see if there have been any known breaches. If you use a password that someone else has previously used, and it has been breached, it is “burned” and no longer safe to use by anybody. haveibeenpwned.com/Passwords

3 thoughts on “Passwords: Part 4

  1. RecoveryWise says:

    I checked my email, all was good. But I don’t trust putting a password in to check. Call me paranoid.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ronnie says:

      Some security software has a “paranoid mode”. The best form of carefulness is paranoia. Some people have benefitted from using Pwned Passwords because they have been using a password that has been compromised. Something they were not aware of until they used this facility. If you do not have an email address security breach then doing a password check is not so relevant.

      In “Passwords Part 1” if you use passwordmeter.com and enter “similar types” of passwords to what you usually use, that will give you an idea of how strong your password is. Anyone who uses a Password Manager is ahead of the game, because not only do they have very strong passwords, but logging into accounts securely or creating new accounts is a lot easier.

      Although using 12 characters is quite a good length for a password, I use more than double that, because my password manager does it for me. And that is without being paranoid. 🙂

      The more that people use the same password for multiple accounts, the more they increase the chances of a security breach. Even when people are aware of this, they still do it anyway. There is a big demand on the Dark Web for email addresses with a password, because of the number of people who use the same password for everything.

      Like

      1. RecoveryWise says:

        I think I will have a look at it again.

        Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: